Ancient Greek Drama; Mass Psychotherapy?

Had the Ancient Greek Drama been a method of ‘mass psychotherapy‘? Quite convincingly, this appears to be the case. This post brings to your knowledge relevant supportive information and links. Continue reading “Ancient Greek Drama; Mass Psychotherapy?”

Advertisements

Split and continuous sleep in teens impact cognition and glucose levels differently

Many adolescent students sleep less than the recommended duration of 8-10 hours a night. It is unclear; however, whether short night sleep combined with an afternoon nap is as good as having the same amount of sleep continuously during the night without a nap. Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School have demonstrated for the first time that different sleep schedules with the same total sleep opportunity over 24 hours may have dissimilar effects on cognition and glucose levels. This is the first study to gather experimental evidence on the notion that ‘what may be appropriate sleep for one health goal may not be for another’. Continue reading “Split and continuous sleep in teens impact cognition and glucose levels differently”

Youthful cognitive ability strongly predicts mental capacity later in life

Early adult general cognitive ability (GCA) — the diverse set of skills involved in thinking, such as reasoning, memory and perception — is a stronger predictor of cognitive function and reserve later in life than other factors, such as higher education, occupational complexity or engaging in late-life intellectual activities, report researchers in a new study publishing January 21 in PNAS. Continue reading “Youthful cognitive ability strongly predicts mental capacity later in life”

Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Consider high-intensity interval exercise

It’s fast-paced, takes less time to do, and burns a lot of calories. High-intensity interval exercise is widely recognized as the most time-efficient and effective way to exercise. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Florida Atlantic University have discovered another important health benefit of these short bursts of intense exercise with rest intervals. It could also be an effective strategy to prevent and combat cognitive dysfunction in obese individuals. Continue reading “Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Consider high-intensity interval exercise”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑