The Shamir Dolmen Field in Israel

The Intermediate Bronze Age (IB) of the Southern Levant is known as the “Dark Ages.” The large cities of the Early Bronze Age, which were the region’s first urban settlements, collapsed and were abandoned. Continue reading “The Shamir Dolmen Field in Israel”

The spread of Egyptian cults across the early Hellenistic Aegean Sea

During the reign of the first six kings of the Ptolemaic dynasty, which is the period between the end of the 4th century BCE and the middle of the 2nd century BCE, Egyptian cults spread successfully from Egypt, particularly from Alexandria, to ports in the ancient Mediterranean. These cults were formed almost exclusively around the divine couple of Isis and Sarapis. Continue reading “The spread of Egyptian cults across the early Hellenistic Aegean Sea”

Creation of a new political elite in the Eastern Roman (‘Byzantine’) World through a process of political marriages – A high-point of ‘Byzantine’ diplomacy

Even though the fall of Constantinople to the Fourth Crusade in April 1204 marked a turning point in the history of Southeastern Europe and the entire Eastern Mediterranean world, changing—often radically—the political, cultural, religious, economic and social circumstances in this vast region, a wave of changes beginning exactly one century before this significant event had already transformed the political system in Southeastern Europe, that is, in the Byzantine Empire᾽s European hinterland. Continue reading “Creation of a new political elite in the Eastern Roman (‘Byzantine’) World through a process of political marriages – A high-point of ‘Byzantine’ diplomacy”

The first accurate description of uterine carcinoma by Aretaeus of Cappadocia

Uterine cancer had been known since antiquity. The earliest documentation, even tenuous in the extreme, comes from the ancient Egyptian Kahun papyrus (c. 2000 BC). A small passage from another Egyptian papyrus, the Ebers, written in 1500 BC, that was mentioning: “woman gnawed in her uterus and in the vagina where ulcers develop” led some authors to conclude that the disease described was uterine cancer. Continue reading “The first accurate description of uterine carcinoma by Aretaeus of Cappadocia”

From Ninus and Semiramis to Sardanapallus: The 1,300 years ancient Assyrian Empire

In the earliest age, then, the kings of Asia were native-born, and in connection with them no memory is preserved of either a notable deed or a personal name. The first to be handed down by tradition to history and memory for us as one who achieved great deeds is Ninus, king of the Assyrians, and of him we shall now endeavour to give a detailed account. Continue reading “From Ninus and Semiramis to Sardanapallus: The 1,300 years ancient Assyrian Empire”

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