Intentional tooth removal in Neolithic Italy

The Italian Neolithic (c. 6500-3200 B.C.; Skeates 1994), while not a homogeneous period, displays continuity in many aspects of culture. Social life was based upon small villages of 25-200 people, supported by unintensified agricultural economies. In spite of a rich record of art and burial practices, little is known about gender-related behaviour and ritual practices. Continue reading “Intentional tooth removal in Neolithic Italy”

Wine production in the Early Neolithic South Caucasus

The earliest biomolecular archaeological and archaeobotanical evidence for grape wine and viniculture from the Near East, ca. 6,000–5,800 BC during the early Neolithic Period, was obtained by applying state-of-the-art archaeological, archaeobotanical, climatic, and chemical methods to newly excavated materials from two sites in Georgia in the South Caucasus. Continue reading “Wine production in the Early Neolithic South Caucasus”

Vast Trade Networks in ‘Prehistoric’ Europe & the Mediterranean – Implications of the findings from Iberia

The identification of archaeological amber has been used in Iberian prehistory to evidence long-distance exchanges and engage Iberia in networks that connect western Europe with central and northern Europe. However, assuming a Baltic origin for these ambers is not usually supported by analytical data and numerous deposits are found in Spain, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary and Romania. Continue reading “Vast Trade Networks in ‘Prehistoric’ Europe & the Mediterranean – Implications of the findings from Iberia”

The Neolithic of Southern China – Lingman-Fujian region

Contrary to the development of intensive agriculture in the middle and lower Yangtze basins, subsistence strategies in Lingnan-Fujian and southwest China after the early Neolithic continued with a heavy emphasis on fishing and hunting. The first direct evidence for farming appeared only in the late phase of the late Neolithic, after 3500 B. C., apparently as a result of farming dispersal from the Yangtze basin. As with the Yangtze basin, we also divide the Neolithic cultures of the Lingnan-Fujian region and southwest China into four phases. Continue reading “The Neolithic of Southern China – Lingman-Fujian region”

The Neolithic of Southern China – Middle and Lower Yangtze River basin

Sandwiched between the Yellow River and Mainland Southeast Asia, southern China lies centrally within eastern Asia. This geographical area can be divided into three geomorphological terrains: the middle and lower Yangtze alluvial plain, the Lingnan (southern Nanling Mountains)-Fujian region, and the Yungui Plateau. During the past 30 years, abundant archaeological discoveries have stimulated a rethinking of the role of southern China in the prehistory of China and Southeast Asia. Continue reading “The Neolithic of Southern China – Middle and Lower Yangtze River basin”

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