The constitution of Lycurgus

Lycurgus had perfectly well understood that all the above changes take place necessarily and naturally, and had taken into consideration that every variety of constitution which is simple and formed on one principle is precarious, as it is soon perverted into the corrupt form which is proper to it and naturally follows on it. Continue reading “The constitution of Lycurgus”

Only the…sight of a few Roman ships averted the conquest of Illyria by Philip V of Macedonia!

During the winter (Note: of 216 B.C.) Philip took into consideration that for his enterprise he would require ships and crews to man them, not it is true with the idea of fighting at sea for he never thought he would be capable of offering battle to the Roman fleet but to transport his troops, land where he wished, and take the enemy by surprise. Continue reading “Only the…sight of a few Roman ships averted the conquest of Illyria by Philip V of Macedonia!”

The Peace of Naupactus (217 BC) – The speech of Agelaus of Naupactus to Philip V, King of Macedonia

“It would be best of all if the Greeks never made war on each other, but regarded it as the highest favour in the gift of the gods could they speak ever with one heart and voice, and marching arm in arm like men fording a river, repel barbarian invaders and unite in preserving themselves and their cities. Continue reading “The Peace of Naupactus (217 BC) – The speech of Agelaus of Naupactus to Philip V, King of Macedonia”

Antiochus III the Great vs Ptolemy IV Philopator; the struggle for Coele-Syria – The battle of Raphia (217 B.C.)

When Ptolemy and his sister after their progress had reached the extremity of his left wing and Antiochus with his horse-guards had reached his extreme right, they gave the signal for battle and brought the elephants first into action. Continue reading “Antiochus III the Great vs Ptolemy IV Philopator; the struggle for Coele-Syria – The battle of Raphia (217 B.C.)”

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