The Chaotian and Wude Temples from Yunlin, Beigang, Taiwan

This post is mostly a photographic presentation of the Chaotian and Wude Temples from Yunlin, Beigang, Taiwan.

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The Chaotian Temple

The island of Taiwan has an area of 35,808 square kilometres (13,826 sq mi), with mountain ranges dominating the eastern two-thirds and plains in the western third, where its highly urbanised population is concentrated. Taipei is the capital and largest metropolitan area.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan)

taiwan

Taiwan on the World Map

Yunlin County was established during the Qing Dynasty. Liu Mingchuan was in charge of Taiwan, which had been divided into three counties since 1683, Yunlin being part of Zhuluo County. Mountains made transportation and communication between bordering counties (Changhua and Chiayi) difficult, so Liu suggested a new county, called Yunlin, for easier management. In 1887, Yunlin became one of the four counties of the new Taiwan Prefecture.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yunlin_County)

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The Wude Temple

Beigang or Peikang is an urban township in Yunlin County, Taiwan. It is primarily known for its Chaotian Temple, one of the most famous temples of Mazu on Taiwan.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beigang,_Yunlin)

Chaotian Temple

The Chaotian or Chaotien Temple, officially the Chao-Tian Temple, is a temple to the Chinese sea-goddess Mazu in Beigang Township, Yunlin County, Taiwan. Constructed in 1700, it became one of the most important Mazu temples in Taiwan and is known for its extravagant temple architecture.

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(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaotian_Temple)

Wude Temple

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(Important Note: ALL photographs of this article added to the sourced texts by NovoScriptorium after kind courtesy of our friend Ben Lee – ALL photographs originally taken by Ben Lee)

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