Relations between the Aegean and Central Mediterranean during the Bronze Age

The discussion of inter-Mediterranean exchanges between the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age is resumed here, seeking to focus upon the period following the great transformations which took place in the Aegean and the Near East around the year 1200 BC, and prior to the first voyages of the Phoenicians and the Euboeans into the central Mediterranean. Continue reading “Relations between the Aegean and Central Mediterranean during the Bronze Age”

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Wine production in the Early Neolithic South Caucasus

The earliest biomolecular archaeological and archaeobotanical evidence for grape wine and viniculture from the Near East, ca. 6,000–5,800 BC during the early Neolithic Period, was obtained by applying state-of-the-art archaeological, archaeobotanical, climatic, and chemical methods to newly excavated materials from two sites in Georgia in the South Caucasus. Continue reading “Wine production in the Early Neolithic South Caucasus”

Mycenaean Bridges; in constant operation for at least 3,000 years

The ancient bridges and their remnants located in the vicinity of Mycenae and Arkadico villages are considered to be the world’s oldest bridges. The bridges were built with massive irregular limestone blocks, called Cyclopean boulders, in the Bronze Age. Two of the four objects discussed here are still in operation, occasionally used for the needs of local agriculture. Continue reading “Mycenaean Bridges; in constant operation for at least 3,000 years”

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