Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance

Neanderthals have been imagined as the inferior cousins of modern humans, but a new study by archaeologists at University College London reveals for the first time that they produced weaponry advanced enough to kill at a distance. Continue reading “Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance”

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Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe

How did European megalith graves arise and spread? Using radiocarbon dates from a large quantity of material, an archaeologist at the University of Gothenburg has been able to show that people in the younger Stone Age were far more mobile than previously thought, had quite advanced seafaring skills, and that there were exchanges between different parts of Europe. Continue reading “Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe”

Dog burial as common ritual in Neolithic populations of north-eastern Iberian Peninsula

‘Coinciding with the Pit Grave culture (4200-3600 years before our era), coming from Southern Europe, the Neolithic communities of the north-eastern Iberian Peninsula started a ceremonial activity related to the sacrifice and burial of dogs. The high amount of cases that are recorded in Catalonia suggests it was a general practice and it proves the tight relationship between humans and these animals, which, apart from being buried next to them, were fed a similar diet to humans’. Continue reading “Dog burial as common ritual in Neolithic populations of north-eastern Iberian Peninsula”

The Aegean (Mycenean) origin of the Philistines

After all these centuries of calumny, the Philistines are finally having some good things said about them. They were not, it seems, deserving of that withering epithet: Philistine.

Archeologists are uncovering increasing evidence that the Philistines, arch foes of the Israelites in biblical times whose name became synonymous with barbarity and boorishness, were actually the creators of fine pottery and grand architecture, clever urban planners and cosmopolitan devotees of the grape. If anything, the Israelites, at the time mostly shepherds and farmers in the hills, were the less-sophisticated and -cultured folk. Continue reading “The Aegean (Mycenean) origin of the Philistines”

Necropolis near Bethlehem confirms Caananite town existed – The findings provide evidence of a thriving settlement

A team of Italian and Palestinian archaeologists have discovered an ancient necropolis with more than 100 tombs near Bethlehem. Though many of the tombs have been looted the findings provide proof for the first time that there was a nearby city that thrived in Caananite times. Continue reading “Necropolis near Bethlehem confirms Caananite town existed – The findings provide evidence of a thriving settlement”

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