Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The seventh century Lombard Italy

From the early seventh century the sources available to us are more numerous and more evenly distributed across the west. By this period, the ‘ethnic’ armies descended from the late Roman field armies had evolved into armies raised from classes of landowners. This evolution continued through the seventh century. Continue reading “Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The seventh century Lombard Italy”

Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The seventh century Anglo-Saxon England

From the early seventh century the sources available to us are more numerous and more evenly distributed across the west. By this period, the ‘ethnic’ armies descended from the late Roman field armies had evolved into armies raised from classes of landowners. This evolution continued through the seventh century. Continue reading “Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The seventh century Anglo-Saxon England”

Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The seventh century Frankish Gaul

From the early seventh century the sources available to us are more numerous and more evenly distributed across the west. By this period, the ‘ethnic’ armies descended from the late Roman field armies had evolved into armies raised from classes of landowners. This evolution continued through the seventh century. Continue reading “Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The seventh century Frankish Gaul”

Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The later fifth and early sixth centuries

The crucial period during and immediately following the final demise of the western Roman Empire is unfortunately badly served by written sources, so much of our discussion must be hypothetical, using the patchy fifth-century evidence and attempting to draw inferences from what appear to be remnants or survivals from this period in the sources of the sixth century. This method is far from satisfactory but a fairly coherent picture seems to emerge. Continue reading “Raising an army in Post-Roman Europe – The later fifth and early sixth centuries”

English refugees were the most prominent element in the Eastern Roman (‘Byzantine’) Varangian Guard from the late 11th to the 13th century

One of the most interesting episodes in Byzantine military history and in medieval English history is the Anglo-Saxon participation and service in the Varangian Guards regiment from the late 11th to the early 13th century. Continue reading “English refugees were the most prominent element in the Eastern Roman (‘Byzantine’) Varangian Guard from the late 11th to the 13th century”

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