Megalithic Portugal: Possible astronomical orientation of the Carregal do Sal dolmens

In this post we present selected parts of the very informative paper titled: “Landscape and Astronomy in Megalithic Portugal: the Carregal do Sal Nucleus and Star Mountain Range“, by Fabio Silva, 2012. Continue reading “Megalithic Portugal: Possible astronomical orientation of the Carregal do Sal dolmens”

The fall of a meteorite at Aegos Potami and record of a comet passing close to Earth in the 5th century BC

Aegos Potami, a name meaning in Greek ‘Rivers’ (=Potami) ‘of the Goat’ (=Aega) – although the Greek prefix ‘aeg-‘ means a place generally near water -, was a stream with an ancient small town built next to its estuary on the eastern shore of the Gallipoli Peninsula in Eastern Thrace, opposite Lampsacus and Avydus. Continue reading “The fall of a meteorite at Aegos Potami and record of a comet passing close to Earth in the 5th century BC”

Archaeological evidence suggests that Minoan Astronomy had been quite advanced during the 2nd millennium B.C.

Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean — the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan — we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents. Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. Continue reading “Archaeological evidence suggests that Minoan Astronomy had been quite advanced during the 2nd millennium B.C.”

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