The Late Bronze Age Collapse and the ‘Greek Dark Ages’ have economic, military, and climatic explanations

At the end of the Late Bronze Age (LBA) most Eastern Mediterranean urban centers were either destroyed or abandoned throughout the Near East and Aegean. Continue reading “The Late Bronze Age Collapse and the ‘Greek Dark Ages’ have economic, military, and climatic explanations”

Archaeological evidence suggests that Minoan Astronomy had been quite advanced during the 2nd millennium B.C.

Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean — the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan — we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents. Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. Continue reading “Archaeological evidence suggests that Minoan Astronomy had been quite advanced during the 2nd millennium B.C.”

A Mycenaean tholos in Messina coastal plain, Sicily

During recent decades, the intense research in the field, realized by the Messina Cultural and Environmental Heritage Survey with the collaboration of some researchers of the Messina University, has provided the occasion to integrate archaeological, stratigraphic, and palaeoenvironmental data useful for reconstructing the geological framework of the coastal plain underlying the urban area of Messina and of its natural seaport. Continue reading “A Mycenaean tholos in Messina coastal plain, Sicily”

Metal sources and Trade networks in Bronze Age Europe

The Bronze Age was the first long period in human history when widespread trade networks connected Europe and the wider Eurasian continent, defining a pre-modern era of globalization, or, ‘bronzization’. One of the driving forces behind the inter-regional trade was the constant need for metals, and other raw materials and goods available only in certain parts of Europe. Continue reading “Metal sources and Trade networks in Bronze Age Europe”

Bronze Age settlement of Scoglio del Tonno, Apulia, Italy; maritime routes connecting the eastern and central Mediterranean

Scoglio del Tonno is presently part of the urban area of Taranto (Apulia) and is among the most important sites of Bronze Age southern Italy. The period of interest examined here is the local Late Bronze Age (LBA), i.e., the Recent Bronze Age (RBA), ca. 1350-1200 BC, and possibly the earliest part of the Final Bronze Age (FBA), ca. 1200-1000 BC. Continue reading “Bronze Age settlement of Scoglio del Tonno, Apulia, Italy; maritime routes connecting the eastern and central Mediterranean”

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