Metal sources and Trade networks in Bronze Age Europe

The Bronze Age was the first long period in human history when widespread trade networks connected Europe and the wider Eurasian continent, defining a pre-modern era of globalization, or, ‘bronzization’. One of the driving forces behind the inter-regional trade was the constant need for metals, and other raw materials and goods available only in certain parts of Europe. Continue reading “Metal sources and Trade networks in Bronze Age Europe”

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Bronze Age settlement of Scoglio del Tonno, Apulia, Italy; maritime routes connecting the eastern and central Mediterranean

Scoglio del Tonno is presently part of the urban area of Taranto (Apulia) and is among the most important sites of Bronze Age southern Italy. The period of interest examined here is the local Late Bronze Age (LBA), i.e., the Recent Bronze Age (RBA), ca. 1350-1200 BC, and possibly the earliest part of the Final Bronze Age (FBA), ca. 1200-1000 BC. Continue reading “Bronze Age settlement of Scoglio del Tonno, Apulia, Italy; maritime routes connecting the eastern and central Mediterranean”

Relations between the Aegean and Central Mediterranean during the Bronze Age

The discussion of inter-Mediterranean exchanges between the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age is resumed here, seeking to focus upon the period following the great transformations which took place in the Aegean and the Near East around the year 1200 BC, and prior to the first voyages of the Phoenicians and the Euboeans into the central Mediterranean. Continue reading “Relations between the Aegean and Central Mediterranean during the Bronze Age”

Mycenaean Bridges; in constant operation for at least 3,000 years

The ancient bridges and their remnants located in the vicinity of Mycenae and Arkadico villages are considered to be the world’s oldest bridges. The bridges were built with massive irregular limestone blocks, called Cyclopean boulders, in the Bronze Age. Two of the four objects discussed here are still in operation, occasionally used for the needs of local agriculture. Continue reading “Mycenaean Bridges; in constant operation for at least 3,000 years”

Vast Trade Networks in ‘Prehistoric’ Europe & the Mediterranean – Implications of the findings from Iberia

The identification of archaeological amber has been used in Iberian prehistory to evidence long-distance exchanges and engage Iberia in networks that connect western Europe with central and northern Europe. However, assuming a Baltic origin for these ambers is not usually supported by analytical data and numerous deposits are found in Spain, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary and Romania. Continue reading “Vast Trade Networks in ‘Prehistoric’ Europe & the Mediterranean – Implications of the findings from Iberia”

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