The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 4)

by Vladimir Moss

The English Monarchy

“In the intricate web of vassalage,” writes J.M. Roberts, “a king might have less control over his own vassals than they over theirs. The great lord, whether lay magnate or local bishop, must always have loomed larger and more important in the life of the ordinary man than the remote and probably never-seen king or prince. In the tenth and eleventh centuries there are everywhere examples of kings obviously under great pressure from great men. The country where this seemed to present least trouble was Anglo-Saxon England…”[20] Continue reading “The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 4)”

Major Neolithic ceremonial enclosure uncovered at Windsor

A major 5,500 year old Neolithic ceremonial gathering place known as a causewayed enclosure has been partially uncovered within sight of Windsor Castle in Berkshire. The discovery was made at Riding Court Farm, near Datchet as part of CEMEX UK’s archaeological programme on the quarrying site, which is monitored on behalf of the local planning authority by Berkshire Archaeology. Continue reading “Major Neolithic ceremonial enclosure uncovered at Windsor”

The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 3)

by Vladimir Moss

The Growth of Feudalism

Thus was the Papist heresy crushed – for the time being. However, the serpent of Papism lay bruised, not completely scotched; and a more permanent triumph could be hoped for only if a healthy antidote against its poison could be built up within the West. Continue reading “The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 3)”

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