South West England – Upper Palaeolithic Archaeology (c.40–10,000 BP)

This post is a presentation of the Upper Palaeolithic Archaeology of South West England. Continue reading “South West England – Upper Palaeolithic Archaeology (c.40–10,000 BP)”

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Burial sites from 5th and 6th centuries yield unexpected treasures

Archaeologists have uncovered lavish burial sites for women in Lincolnshire from the fifth and sixth centuries, which illustrate how women of the time made themselves resplendent.

Items recovered from the previously unknown Anglo-Saxon cemetery include jewellery made from amber, silver and glass as well as personal grooming items such as tweezers. Continue reading “Burial sites from 5th and 6th centuries yield unexpected treasures”

The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 5)

by Vladimir Moss

Rome and the Holy Roman Empire

Turning to Rome now: the first half of the tenth century was probably the period of the deepest degradation in the eternal city’s pre-schism history – the so-called “pornocracy” of Marozia, an evil woman who with her mother Theodora made, unmade, lived with and begat a series of popes. However, in 932 Marozia’s second son Alberic, marquis of Spoleto, imprisoned his mother, took over the government of Rome and gave it a short period of peace and relative respectability. But in 955 Alberic died and his son Octavian became Pope John XII at the age of sixteen. Continue reading “The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 5)”

The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 4)

by Vladimir Moss

The English Monarchy

“In the intricate web of vassalage,” writes J.M. Roberts, “a king might have less control over his own vassals than they over theirs. The great lord, whether lay magnate or local bishop, must always have loomed larger and more important in the life of the ordinary man than the remote and probably never-seen king or prince. In the tenth and eleventh centuries there are everywhere examples of kings obviously under great pressure from great men. The country where this seemed to present least trouble was Anglo-Saxon England…”[20] Continue reading “The fall of Orthodox England – The Ecclesiastical Roots of the Norman Conquest, 1043-1087 (Part 4)”

Major Neolithic ceremonial enclosure uncovered at Windsor

A major 5,500 year old Neolithic ceremonial gathering place known as a causewayed enclosure has been partially uncovered within sight of Windsor Castle in Berkshire. The discovery was made at Riding Court Farm, near Datchet as part of CEMEX UK’s archaeological programme on the quarrying site, which is monitored on behalf of the local planning authority by Berkshire Archaeology. Continue reading “Major Neolithic ceremonial enclosure uncovered at Windsor”

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