Roman Empire vs the Goths; The disastrous battle of Hadrianople and a series of events with great importance in the future shaping of Europe

The battle of Hadrianople was fought on August 9 (A.D. 378); the leader of the Goths was Fritigern; the Romans were commanded by Emperor Valens himself. Valens made the great error of under-estimating the enemy. Continue reading “Roman Empire vs the Goths; The disastrous battle of Hadrianople and a series of events with great importance in the future shaping of Europe”

Metal sources and Trade networks in Bronze Age Europe

The Bronze Age was the first long period in human history when widespread trade networks connected Europe and the wider Eurasian continent, defining a pre-modern era of globalization, or, ‘bronzization’. One of the driving forces behind the inter-regional trade was the constant need for metals, and other raw materials and goods available only in certain parts of Europe. Continue reading “Metal sources and Trade networks in Bronze Age Europe”

Vast Trade Networks in ‘Prehistoric’ Europe & the Mediterranean – Implications of the findings from Iberia

The identification of archaeological amber has been used in Iberian prehistory to evidence long-distance exchanges and engage Iberia in networks that connect western Europe with central and northern Europe. However, assuming a Baltic origin for these ambers is not usually supported by analytical data and numerous deposits are found in Spain, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary and Romania. Continue reading “Vast Trade Networks in ‘Prehistoric’ Europe & the Mediterranean – Implications of the findings from Iberia”

Does the Megalithic Tradition have an ‘origin’?

There are ∼35,000 presently extant European Megaliths – ancient monuments constructed from one or more blocks of stone – that remain all across Europe. Most of them come from the Neolithic period and the Copper Age. The majority of them are concentrated in coastal areas, while there are quite a few in the inland, too (e.g. Thrace -modern day Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey). Continue reading “Does the Megalithic Tradition have an ‘origin’?”

First New World inhabitants had strong ties with Europe, study suggests – Jomon and Ainu from Japan show morphological similarities with European populations

Here we present extended parts of the very interesting paper titled “Old World sources of the first New World human inhabitants: a comparative craniofacial view“, by C. Loring Brace et al. Continue reading “First New World inhabitants had strong ties with Europe, study suggests – Jomon and Ainu from Japan show morphological similarities with European populations”

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