Origins of the Western Monasticism in the 4th and 5th c. A.D.

by George Valsamis

The issue of the origins of organised monasticism has caused much talk. Continue reading “Origins of the Western Monasticism in the 4th and 5th c. A.D.”

‘Divine Providence’ saves the Eastern part of the Roman Empire (408-518 A.D.) – Pulcheria becomes the first woman Empress – Successful reconstruction of the Roman military forces

Arcadius died in A.D. 408, at the early age of thirty-one; his imperious consort had preceded him to the grave, and the empire of the East was left to Theodosius II., a child of seven years, their only son. Continue reading “‘Divine Providence’ saves the Eastern part of the Roman Empire (408-518 A.D.) – Pulcheria becomes the first woman Empress – Successful reconstruction of the Roman military forces”

The foundation of Constantinople

Constantine, whose victory over his rivals had been secured by his talents as an administrator and a diplomatist no less than by his military skill, was one of those men whose hard practical ability has stamped upon the history of the world a much deeper impress than has been left by many conquerors and legislators of infinitely greater genius. He was a man of that self-contained, self-reliant, unsympathetic type of mind which we recognize in his great predecessor Augustus. Continue reading “The foundation of Constantinople”

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