Roman coins in China

Plenty of ancient Chinese sources have been proved keeping rich accounts of the Roman Empire and its close relationship with ancient China, and the frequent activities of envoys, caravans, religious missions and wars on the Silk Road promoted the accomplishment of the mutual communication between the two great civilizations. Continue reading “Roman coins in China”

Byzantium, Persia and China: Interstate relations on the eve of the Islamic conquest

By Samuel Lieu

The destruction of the Hephthalite Empire in Transoxiana by the combined forces of the Shahanshah Khusrau Anushirvan and the Western Turks in the sixth century (c. A.D. 557) was an event of great significance to the history of China’s trade and diplomatic contacts with the western empires of Iran and Byzantium. Continue reading “Byzantium, Persia and China: Interstate relations on the eve of the Islamic conquest”

Handicrafts and artworks from Greece were found in the ruins of ancient Niya, China

The archeological site known as Niya (hereafter referred to as the Ruins of Ancient Niya), which lies deep in the Takla Makan Desert on the southern rim of the Tarim Basin in present-day Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, has been called the Pompeii of the East, owing to Niya having been buried, quite suddenly, as had ancient Pompeii ages earlier. Or so it seems, for no one really knows what caused the residents of Niya to abandon their city in such a panic that they even left their dogs tethered in front of their houses, apparently fleeing for their lives from some unknown-to-us, impending calamity. Continue reading “Handicrafts and artworks from Greece were found in the ruins of ancient Niya, China”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑