Herman Tristram Engelhardt: How I Became Orthodox

Dr. Engelhardt was born in Texas to Roman Catholic parents, but became Orthodox in his mature years, taking the name Herman after St. Herman of Alaska. He studied philosophy and medicine and is now a professor at two Universities in Houston, Texas. His research has been done mainly in Bioethics and his most important contribution to Orthodox ethics is his book “The Foundations of Christian Bioethics“. At the Symposium for Intensive Care organized in Bucharest, Professor of Philosophy and Medicine Tristram Engelhardt presented a paper. During a discussion in Bucharest, a question was put forward on how he became Orthodox. His reply is published below transcribed directly from a recording and translated [to Greek] by Anastasios Philippides. Continue reading “Herman Tristram Engelhardt: How I Became Orthodox”

“The ancient Christian Church – About Orthodox Church in the West World” – Saint Melangell the Abbess of Wales

St. Melangell the Abbess of Wales (†641) – Commemorated May 27 / January 31

“The Church in The British Isles will only begin to grow when she begins to venerate her own Saints” -Saint Arsenios of Paros (†1877) Continue reading ““The ancient Christian Church – About Orthodox Church in the West World” – Saint Melangell the Abbess of Wales”

“The ancient Christian Church – About Orthodox Church in the West World” – The rich unknown heritage of Western Saints

by James Read

Despite the universality of the Holy Orthodox Church, it is not infrequently that converts confess to feeling “out of place” in the Russian, Greek, Serbian, or other ethnic tradition which, with few exceptions, dominates parish life in the Orthodox West. Continue reading ““The ancient Christian Church – About Orthodox Church in the West World” – The rich unknown heritage of Western Saints”

“The ancient Christian Church – About Orthodox Church in the West World” – St. Patrick

Saint Patrick (Latin: Patricius, Irish: Naomh Pádraig) was a Celtic Briton and Christian missionary, who is the most generally recognised patron saint of Ireland (although Brigid of Kildare and Columba are also formally patron saints).was a Romano-Briton by birth. He was probably born in 390 on what is now the north-west coast of England at an unidentified place called Bannavem Taburniae. The son of a town councillor, his grandfather had been a priest. Bearing the Roman name ‘Patricius’, meaning ‘noble’, he was brought up to speak Latin but paid no attention to the teachings of Christianity.  Continue reading ““The ancient Christian Church – About Orthodox Church in the West World” – St. Patrick”

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