Prayer in Ancient Greece

In this post we present excerpts from the memorable work of Athanasios Stageiritis* “Ogygia or Archaeology” (Ωγυγία ή Αρχαιολογία) which refer to praying and in general to the stance of Greeks towards the Divine. Continue reading “Prayer in Ancient Greece”

The fall of a meteorite at Aegos Potami and record of a comet passing close to Earth in the 5th century BC

Aegos Potami, a name meaning in Greek ‘Rivers’ (=Potami) ‘of the Goat’ (=Aega) – although the Greek prefix ‘aeg-‘ means a place generally near water -, was a stream with an ancient small town built next to its estuary on the eastern shore of the Gallipoli Peninsula in Eastern Thrace, opposite Lampsacus and Avydus. Continue reading “The fall of a meteorite at Aegos Potami and record of a comet passing close to Earth in the 5th century BC”

The cultural significance of earthquakes in Greek antiquity – An association between active faults and ancient places

Throughout human history in the eastern Mediterranean region, urban settlements have co-existed with earthquakes. The destructive capability of seismic activity is well chronicled by historians, and its cultural wreckage widely uncovered by archaeologists. Continue reading “The cultural significance of earthquakes in Greek antiquity – An association between active faults and ancient places”

Theocracy against Science and Philosophy; the less known face of ancient Athens

In Hellenistic and Roman times, the prevailing view was still the geocentric one. The brilliant heliocentric theory advanced by Aristarchos in the early third century B.C. was never established, because it met with hostility in Athens—Aristarchos was accused of impiety and faced the death penalty. Continue reading “Theocracy against Science and Philosophy; the less known face of ancient Athens”

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