Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe

How did European megalith graves arise and spread? Using radiocarbon dates from a large quantity of material, an archaeologist at the University of Gothenburg has been able to show that people in the younger Stone Age were far more mobile than previously thought, had quite advanced seafaring skills, and that there were exchanges between different parts of Europe. Continue reading “Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe”

Advertisements

Rethinking the history related to indigenous sites in northeast North America

After radiocarbon dating of plant matter, wood and wood charcoal, scientists estimate that the presumed histories of several key indigenous sites in Canada, as relates to first contact with Europeans, are incorrect by about 50 to 100 years. The findings suggest that European trade goods previously used to date individual locations are not in fact good chronological markers and that the history of notable “contact-era” events in northeastern North America during the 15th to early 17th centuries may need to be revaluated. Continue reading “Rethinking the history related to indigenous sites in northeast North America”

New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletons

Interest in the origins of human populations and their migration routes has increased greatly in recent years. A critical aspect of tracing migration events is dating them. However, the radiocarbon techniques*, that are commonly used to date and analyse DNA from ancient skeletons can be inaccurate and not always possible to apply. Inspired by the Geographic Population Structure model that can track mutations in DNA that are associated with geography, researchers have developed a new analytic method, the Time Population Structure (TPS), that uses mutations to predict time in order to date the ancient DNA. Continue reading “New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletons”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑