The historical importance of the westward movement of the Huns into Europe

A new enemy was on the horizon, an enemy of Teuton and Roman alike. The nomad hordes known to history as the Huns appeared in the reign of Emperor Valens west of the Caspian Sea, and swept over southern Russia. Continue reading “The historical importance of the westward movement of the Huns into Europe”

694 CE: Visigoth King Enslaves the Jews

On November 9, 694, C.E., the Seventeenth Council of Toledo convened, in the eponymous capital of Visigoth Spain, and passed a wide-ranging series of restrictions on the Jews of the kingdom. The rules and prohibitions were a continuation of an ongoing effort to lessen the influence of Jews and their religion on society, but ratcheted the pressure on the Jews up a notch by adding a new, political rationale for the measures. Continue reading “694 CE: Visigoth King Enslaves the Jews”

The Germans to 476 A.D. – Battle of Adrianople – The Visigothic kingdom

Our earliest notice of the Germans is found in the “Commentaries” by Julius Caesar, who twice invaded their country. About a century and a half later the Roman historian, Tacitus, wrote a little book called “Germany”, which gives an account of the people as they were before coming under the influence of Rome and Christianity. Continue reading “The Germans to 476 A.D. – Battle of Adrianople – The Visigothic kingdom”

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